Sam Francis

Untitled, 1984

106.7 X 73 inch

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What is a screen-print?

What is a screen-print?

Refers to a print produced through a printing technique in which a ink is transferred using a mesh to a substrate safe for those areas blocked with a stencil to make them impermeable to ink. Screen prints are usually made on posters, T-shirts, vinyl, stickers and wood or any material usable for this purpose. Screen printing is also a method of stencil printing and is sometimes known as serigraphy, serigraph printing, screen or silk screen. 

Image © Petr Lerch/Shutterstock

Victor Vasarely

Vilag,

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

EUR 2,300

Tom Wesselmann

Thames Scene with Power Station, 1990

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

Inquire For Price

Robert Motherwell

Untitled No. 8, 1971

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

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Andy Warhol

Mick Jagger (FS 142), 1975

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

Inquire For Price

David Shrigley

Untitled (Cat), 2019

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

GBP 3,900

Tom Wesselmann

Fast Sketch Still Life with Abstract Painting, 1989

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

Inquire For Price

Keith Haring

Pop Shop I (D), 1987

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

Currently Not Available

Roy Lichtenstein

Sweet dreams, Baby!, 1965

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

Inquire For Price

David Shrigley

Wine, 2021

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

GBP 5,440

Keith Haring

Portrait of Joseph Beuys, 1986

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

USD 23,500

Andy Warhol

Sitting Bull, 1986

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

USD 70,500

Andy Warhol

Blackglama, 1985

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

USD 59,500

Andy Warhol

After the Party - F&S183, 1979

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

USD 37,500

Andy Warhol

Jimmy Carter, 1977

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

USD 11,300

Andy Warhol

Flowers (II.68), 1970

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

USD 109,500

Andy Warhol

Mao (II.98), 1972

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

USD 65,000

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Cubism

Cubism was the attempt to depict different views of objects or figures together in one picture. Artists George Braque and Pablo Picasso began this style around 1907, and the name cubism resulted from their compositional use of geometric outlines resembling cubes.

Neo-Dada

Minor visual and audio art movement whose intent is similar to that of Dada artwork. While this art is a revival of some of Dada's objectives, Neo Dada emphasizes the importance of produced artwork rather than the concept used to generate the work. It is regarded as the foundation of Pop art, Nouveau realisme and Fluxus. It is known for its use of absurdist contrast, popular imagery and modern materials.

Futurism

Futurism was an early twentieth century art movement seeking to capture the energy of the modern world. Italian Filippo Tommaso Marinetti published his Manifesto of Futurism on February 20, 1909, launching the modernist movement. It denounced the past, and embraced technology and industry.

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